The Learning Strategies Program at Dunn School celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2014. Hundreds of students and parents—and an extraordinarily dedicated team of faculty—have been part of this groundbreaking program. Four decades later, it's stronger than ever.

A Bold Vision, A Rare Educator

In 1973, head of school Bill Webb flew to New York to interview Nancy Roome. He needed to hire a learning specialist to establish an innovative program for talented students who had reading challenges. After meeting Nancy, he knew he had found the right person for the job. Under Webb and Roome, Dunn pioneered the concept of integrating a learning strategies program into a traditional college-prep school.
 
Ahead of its time, Dunn made a bold promise: bright, college-bound students would receive personal daily support for their learning style and follow the same, rigorous college-prep curriculum as their peers.
 
Every student would be prepared for selective 4-year universities. Families came from across the country, and the program took off.

The Results: Top Colleges and Changed Lives

The results spoke for themselves: students gained confidence and self-awareness. They proved that learning differences can be turned into advantages, not just in school but in life. Students achieved outstanding college placements and long-term career accomplishments.
 
As a result of the extraordinary vision and commitment of Bill Webb, Nancy Roome, and other Learning Strategies teachers, Dunn not only supported the future success of its students, but proved a new model for respectful, mainstream learning support in a college-prep environment.

Learning Strategies Today

Today, under the inspired leadership of Alice Berg and Leslie Vincent, Dunn's Learning Strategies Program is an international model in learning support within a rigorous college-prep school. Students are matched with one of six full-time learning specialists.

For a family looking for respectful support for learning differences,
I give Dunn my highest recommendation.

—Gaby R. (parent)